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Industry

SiriusXM Video: Nikole Hannah-Jones, Trymaine Lee & Teri Williams Discuss Race in America, the 1619 Project and the psychology behind African Americans not being seen as “fully human”

SiriusXM Urban View Host, Karen Hunter sat down for a town hall discussion with OneUnited Bank President and Owner Teri Williams; New York Times journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator of the Times’ The 1619 Project; and Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and MSNBC Correspondent Trymaine Lee before an audience at SiriusXM studios headquarters in New York.

The panels topics of discussion consisted of race in America, including the wealth gap between African-Americans and Caucasians, The New York Times’ 1619 Project, a powerful initiative that explores the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery and its ongoing impact on our society.

New York Times journalist, Nikole Hannah-Jones discussed how African-Americans are not seen as “fully human”: “I spent a lot of time on my essay talking about the psychology that has to develop that allows a country that says it’s based on the individual rights and God given freedoms of man while also holding one fifth of the population at absolute bondage. You have to develop a certain psychology, and the psychology is black people are not fully human, so we’re not actually hypocritical because these rights are for full humans, and citizens and black people are not. Once that psychology develops, once you use it to justify slavery, when that person is no longer enslaved, you can’t now say you are fully human and a full citizen just like I am because then it gives lie to the whole basis of slavery, which is you’re not human. So you have to keep denying that persons full and that races full humanity to justify it and reinforcing it.”

Teri Williams explains the importance of the 1619 project: “It tells the truth about our history, about our money, about the wealth gap and why we are where we are today. Because we’re led to believe that we don’t have wealth because of something we’ve done. Like, Nikole said, that we just need to work harder or that we spend too much or we spend money on the wrong things and we have bought in to that…and because of that, we don’t trust ourselves, we don’t do business with ourselves, we don’t bank with ourselves, but every other ethnicity doesn’t have that burden. They’re not carrying that negativity with them. They actually see the need to do business with themselves in order to build their community.”

Video clips are below and photos are attached (photo credit: Maro Hagopian for SiriusXM). If used, please credit SiriusXM’s The Karen Hunter Show (weekdays from 3:00-6:00 p.m. ET on SiriusXM Urban View channel 126).

“Black People Are Not Seen As Fully Human”

Why Nikole Hannah-Jones Almost Quit Journalism

Teri Williams on Owning a Black Bank

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Industry

Sybil Wilkes Talks to Radio Facts about New Job and Working with Tom Joyner

Sybil Wilkes Prepares for a New Radio Journey

Sybil Wilkes has inspired, informed and brought the laughter to the Tom Joyner Morning Show for 25 years.  Tom is hanging up the microphone at the end of the year but Sybil will keep bringing that Black Girl Magic to a new show and is just getting started. She chopped it up with Radio Facts’ TV and radio personality Jazmyn Summers 

(This podcast interview has been edited for this post)

JASMYN SUMMERS: Tell us about your new project “Sybil Wilkes What You Need To Know?”

SYBIL WILKES: Oh, my goodness. I am just so blessed and excited to be doing this. I’m lucky to be working with my best friend again. She and I met when Tom brought us all together to do the Tom Joyner Morning Show more than 25 years ago. Yolanda Starks White. We became best friends. She’s coming back out of her so-called retirement in another business to be my executive producer. It really is going to be about, Black Girl Magic, about women doing it for ourselves. This will be done with the help of David Kantor, CEO, Radio Division & Reach Media, and all the other good folks at Radio One and the Radio One properties.

I’m going to be delivering news and political updates, as I have been doing for Tom Joyner. But we’ll be doing it for the other syndicated programs that we have. That’s really my passion. I’m very excited and a little nervous, but excited about what the year 2020 and the elections are going to bring. Whatever your political makeup is, whatever your leanings are, I just want people to be involved. And that includes getting people to register to vote I know we said it before, but this is really the most critical election of our lifetime. 

What are the top three types of news stories that you’ll be focusing on?

The most important one is I want to get people registered [to vote] because part of the problem is that there is a real effort on the part of the other party [Republicans] to dismiss people from voting and to have them purged. And so we have to do everything we possibly can to make sure that this does not happen. If this purging had not taken place in Georgia. We would have a black woman governor there right now. 

When you look at the margins of victory around the country particularly where Black folks are strong, all they have to do is peel off a small percentage.  And that’s what the voter suppression does. It impacts Blacks, elderly folks, young people, all the folks who tend to vote Democratic.  

Yeah we got our kids who are in college and they’re taking away the voting polls from the college campuses, especially from the historically black colleges and universities. You have people who have been going to the same place and suddenly finding it gone. My parents are both deceased. But I know that the same school across the street where I grew up, going with my mom to vote, just overnight, they could change that. So voter registration and doing away with the horrible efforts to stop people from voting and combating voter suppression is probably the most important thing in terms of voting. 

You are like a fighter for democracy. You go, girl. 

I really am. I’ll also be doing a newsletter and developing programs that we’re going to take around the country. It’s about helping and supporting black women physically and mentally. My best friend and I, we have a yoga studio in Fort Worth. So when you come to Dallas, People in the studio look like you and me. That’s really important. 

JS:  You’ve been with Tom Joyner for 25 years. What’s the secret to that longevity?

SW:  Mortgage payments? (lol).  Seriously, my mother used to say; where else could I get paid for what I used to get in trouble for? And, you know, in my graduation addresses, I tell students if you can find something you love, you’ll never work a day in your life. And I’ve been blessed to do something that I love. And despite the hours, you know, and getting up at one o’clock and two o’clock and three o’clock in the morning, I really couldn’t imagine doing anything else. 

JS:  You always rock those big words like lagniappe (extra gift or bonus) that helped us all front like we were super smart (lol).  Will that continue? 

SW:  I love the power of words. And that’s why I love radio. I don’t want to do television.  I just love radio. And I love giving people information and also encouraging them to expand their vocabulary and to do great things, helping us grow, helping us grow mind, body, soul. 

JS:  What was the most embarrassing moment with Tom? 

SW:  I don’t know if Tom remembers this, but back in the day before he started wearing all the expensive suits and doing all that, he was just like a real regular guy.  In the summertime, when we would do live shows he would wear shorts and his shirt or whatever and he was going commando.  But here’s the other thing. Tom drinks a lot of water, and he sweats profusely, which is a good thing for your body. But when you’re in the middle of a Sky Show and he’s got these light-colored shorts on and he comes out from behind the stage for another hour of the show … somebody pointed out “Oh, my God! Tom peed on himself!” And we were like, oh, no, no, no, no, no, we had to go and quickly pull him off the set and get him a change of clothes and just get him out of the way. You can’t have the Fly Jock looking like he peed on himself.

JS:  Because you’re funny and can do everything from gossip to news, people don’t realize you are also one deep sister. You’ve got some doctorate degrees going on. You have a bachelor of science in political science and communications studies. I mean, you are the all-around, gorgeous, smart, funny, exciting boss chick.  Does that make dating difficult? We rarely hear about your love life. You keep that on the low – so spill the tea –are you booed up? 

SW:   No, I’m not. And it’s very difficult when you get up in the middle of the night to go to work. First of all, because you can’t stay out and play all night. Here’s the other thing, guys who hear you on the radio think that they want to be a part of the crew. You know, back in the day when it was Tom, J, Myra, Miss. Dupri, me and George Wallace … that’s what they really want. They want to hang with the crew. And so you have to be very discriminating in terms of ‘are they there for the crew?’ ‘Are they there for you?’ And it makes you very wary in terms of relationships. And because I talk for a living. I don’t need to come home and talk for the rest of the day either. But when you are dating in another city it’s even better because when he starts to get bored with me, I’m like, I got to go. (lol)

JS:  I can’t imagine anybody getting bored with you, but you probably can’t online date because you’re a public figure. 

SW:   I’ve not tried it. And you know what? A lot of my friends are still recommending it. I have friends who have met their mates for life online. So I’m open. 

JS:  OK, Well thank you for chopping it up with us.  Check out Sybil Wilkes What you need to know on Radio One. You don’t want to miss it. You will stay informed. You’ll stay laughing. You’ll stay inspired and it’ll keep you healthy. Mind, body, soul. Thanks, Sybil

SW: Thank you Jasmyne.

Jazmyne Summers
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Industry

Paris Nicole, Women of Color in Media “Rising Star”

The first day I got a chance to crack the mic was the day I knew this was exactly what I wanted to do.

Starting her career at just 16 as an intern, Paris Nicole was destined for success. She’s from Richmond, VA and a graduate of Hampton University with a BA in Broadcast Journalism. She’s been featured on some of the top media outlets like TMZ, MTV XXL, Fox 29 and more, and she served as the official host of Virginia for President Barack Obama’s “DJs for Obama” campaign in 2012. She’s a community advocate and a top-rated on-air personality at Philly’s Boom 103.9 where she hosts her daily midday show 9:00 am to 2:00 pm. She was recently promoted to Program Director of Boom 103.9 (WPHI), making her one of the youngest radio executives in the country. We give our Rising Star honor to Paris Nicole for this year’s Celebrating Women of Color in Media magazine.

RADIO FACTS: What’s it like to work in the Philly market?

PARIS NICOLE: It’s amazing to be able to work in such a legendary radio market. When I first moved here, I was told Philly is a tough market; they either love you or they hate you. I have received so much love since my very first day of arriving in the city. To me, it’s an honor to work in Philly radio and when you look at the careers of many of the radio greats, you’ll notice Philly is a common factor for them all. 

What’s unique about WPHI?

WPHI is unique because it’s a combination of a legacy station and a new station. The call letters have a rich history in the market going back over 20 years. However, the new mainstream format for Boom 103.9 has been around for about two years. We are the new voice of the culture in Philadelphia with young fresh talent that are living and breathing the lifestyle.

What interested you in radio?

I always knew I wanted to be in the entertainment industry, but since I couldn’t sing [laughs] the closest route to being on the radio was to be a personality. I first started interning at a radio station when I was 16 in high school. Getting that hands-on experience and interning in every department at the station is how I found my passion. The first day I got a chance to crack the mic was the day I knew this was exactly what I wanted to do.

Tell us about your coat drive.

I started my coat drive about four years ago in Virginia. I noticed when I was driving to work there were kids standing at the bus stops in the freezing cold without coats on. At that very moment, I realized I had to use my platform to make a difference, so I host my annual “Fly Kids Coat Drive” every year to make sure the kids are warm in the winter.

Do you work with any other organizations?

Yes, I partner with the Salvation Army, The School District of Philadelphia, and multiple local charities.

How important do you think it is for radio people to pay it forward?

I think it’s extremely important. Radio is a tough business to break into, and there were a lot of people that helped me get to where I am in my career today. I feel like it is my responsibility to reach back and help open the door for others. 

Do you have mentors?

I’ve been fortunate to get a lot of great career advice over the years from my family. My dad, Steve Branch, has over 30 years of experience in the entertainment industry in owning clubs and concert promotion. To this day he advises me on my career moves. My family has always supported my visions and dreams.

In the industry, Colby “Colb” Tyner has provided me with a lot of guidance and has been a huge influence in my career. I will always appreciate him and everyone that has believed in me and allowed the opportunity to prove myself and break new ground.

Do you mentor anyone?

Yes, I take every opportunity when I meet young people interested in the business to give them encouragement and good advice on how to enter the business and be successful. I also mentor a few young women that are currently in radio. I try to respond to all emails I get about advice on airchecks, how to get started, and making the right career decisions.

What are some of the greatest lessons that you have learned over the last few years?

Never give up. I know it sounds cliché, but in the beginning of my career, there were times when I thought that maybe radio wasn’t for me because I couldn’t land a full-time gig. I learned that not everyone’s journey is the same. Sometimes you may hear how something can’t be done until it’s done. I don’t focus on negativity. I just work hard, believe in myself and go after what I want. I was told that it’s pretty much impossible to go directly from market 56 to a top 10 major market, but I did. I would hear there was no way I could be a Program Director for the first time in a major market, like Philadelphia, but here I am. I love making the impossible possible and beating the odds.

What do you hope to achieve in the near future?

I want to achieve mastery as an executive and a talent. I also want to venture into entertainment television. The goal is to be on radio and television at the same time. I also want to be syndicated in multiple markets.

What do you have to say to other Women of Color in Media of all ages reading your interview?

Don’t let anyone put you in a box because of your age, gender, or ethnicity; barriers are made to be broken. Keep God first, work hard, follow your dreams and, always remember – shoot for the stars, land on the moon.

This story was posted in our 2019 Women of Color in Media

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Industry

WPHI’s Paris Nicole, Women of Color in Media’s “Rising Star”

[penci_blockquote style=”style-2″ align=”none” author=”Paris Nicole”]The first day I got a chance to crack the mic was the day I knew this was exactly what I wanted to do.[/penci_blockquote]

Starting her career at just 16 as an intern, Paris Nicole was destined for success. She’s from Richmond, VA and a graduate of Hampton University with a BA in Broadcast Journalism. She’s been featured on some of the top media outlets like TMZ, MTV XXL, Fox 29 and more, and she served as the official host of Virginia for President Barack Obama’s “DJs for Obama” campaign in 2012. She’s a community advocate and a top-rated on-air personality at Philly’s Boom 103.9 where she hosts her daily midday show 9:00 am to 2:00 pm. She was recently promoted to Program Director of Boom 103.9 (WPHI), making her one of the youngest radio executives in the country. We give our Rising Star honor to Paris Nicole for this year’s Celebrating Women of Color in Media magazine.

RADIO FACTS: What’s it like to work in the Philly market?

PARIS NICOLE: It’s amazing to be able to work in such a legendary radio market. When I first moved here, I was told Philly is a tough market; they either love you or they hate you. I have received so much love since my very first day of arriving in the city. To me, it’s an honor to work in Philly radio and when you look at the careers of many of the radio greats, you’ll notice Philly is a common factor for them all. 

What’s unique about WPHI?

WPHI is unique because it’s a combination of a legacy station and a new station. The call letters have a rich history in the market going back over 20 years. However, the new mainstream format for Boom 103.9 has been around for about two years. We are the new voice of the culture in Philadelphia with young fresh talent that are living and breathing the lifestyle.

What interested you in radio?

I always knew I wanted to be in the entertainment industry, but since I couldn’t sing [laughs] the closest route to being on the radio was to be a personality. I first started interning at a radio station when I was 16 in high school. Getting that hands-on experience and interning in every department at the station is how I found my passion. The first day I got a chance to crack the mic was the day I knew this was exactly what I wanted to do.

Tell us about your coat drive.

I started my coat drive about four years ago in Virginia. I noticed when I was driving to work there were kids standing at the bus stops in the freezing cold without coats on. At that very moment, I realized I had to use my platform to make a difference, so I host my annual “Fly Kids Coat Drive” every year to make sure the kids are warm in the winter.

Do you work with any other organizations?

Yes, I partner with the Salvation Army, The School District of Philadelphia, and multiple local charities.

How important do you think it is for radio people to pay it forward?

I think it’s extremely important. Radio is a tough business to break into, and there were a lot of people that helped me get to where I am in my career today. I feel like it is my responsibility to reach back and help open the door for others. 

Do you have mentors?

I’ve been fortunate to get a lot of great career advice over the years from my family. My dad, Steve Branch, has over 30 years of experience in the entertainment industry in owning clubs and concert promotion. To this day he advises me on my career moves. My family has always supported my visions and dreams.

In the industry, Colby “Colb” Tyner has provided me with a lot of guidance and has been a huge influence in my career. I will always appreciate him and everyone that has believed in me and allowed the opportunity to prove myself and break new ground.

Do you mentor anyone?

Yes, I take every opportunity when I meet young people interested in the business to give them encouragement and good advice on how to enter the business and be successful. I also mentor a few young women that are currently in radio. I try to respond to all emails I get about advice on airchecks, how to get started, and making the right career decisions.

What are some of the greatest lessons that you have learned over the last few years?

Never give up. I know it sounds cliché, but in the beginning of my career, there were times when I thought that maybe radio wasn’t for me because I couldn’t land a full-time gig. I learned that not everyone’s journey is the same. Sometimes you may hear how something can’t be done until it’s done. I don’t focus on negativity. I just work hard, believe in myself and go after what I want. I was told that it’s pretty much impossible to go directly from market 56 to a top 10 major market, but I did. I would hear there was no way I could be a Program Director for the first time in a major market, like Philadelphia, but here I am. I love making the impossible possible and beating the odds.

What do you hope to achieve in the near future?

I want to achieve mastery as an executive and a talent. I also want to venture into entertainment television. The goal is to be on radio and television at the same time. I also want to be syndicated in multiple markets.

What do you have to say to other Women of Color in Media of all ages reading your interview?

Don’t let anyone put you in a box because of your age, gender, or ethnicity; barriers are made to be broken. Keep God first, work hard, follow your dreams and, always remember – shoot for the stars, land on the moon.

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Industry Industry news

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. Celebrating 100 Years With Historic $100k Scholarship

Valerie Hollingsworth Baker, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, International Centennial President

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. Celebrating 100 Years With Historic $100k Scholarship

The prestigious award will be presented to a young woman graduating in 2020 from high school and enrolled in a four-year college Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, an international women’s service organization with a focus on education, will celebrate its centennial year in January 2020 by awarding a historical $100,000 scholarship to a deserving young woman. Eligible students are encouraged to apply by January 16, 2020; a link to the application and detailed instructions can be found here: https://zphib1920.org/eblast/2019/april/Founders-Centennial-Scholarship-packet.pdf

Zeta’s International Centennial President, Valerie Hollingsworth Baker, the inspiration behind The Founders’ Centennial Scholarship, and an exceptional student who earned several academic scholarships when she entered college at the age of 14, remarked, “We were founded on the principles of scholarship, service, sisterhood and finer womanhood with an emphasis on education. I wanted to do something to honor our founders because without them we would not be here ninety-nine and a half years later.” 

Through scholarships funded by its chapters, Zeta has given over $3.5 million in the past five years to help students achieve their college dreams. Hollingsworth Baker added, “As an international service organization, we have made it our mission to make earning a college education easier for deserving students across the globe who may not have the funds to reach these important goals. We hope that giving substantial scholarships catches on among other National Pan-Hellenic Council organizations. This is what we were all founded to do.”

The award is named after Arizona Cleaver Stemons, Zeta’s first president and one of its five founders. The founders, all educators, dedicated their lives to serving others. Beginning in March 2020, The Founders’ Centennial Scholarship will be awarded annually for five consecutive years in honor of the sorority’s five founding members. In addition to the many prizes and gifts to be won during the Centennial Celebration, 10,000 book bags will be distributed.

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, which was founded in 1920 on the campus of Howard University, is headquartered in Washington, D.C. Zeta has initiated a diverse membership of more than 120,000 college-educated women with over 855 chapters in North America, Europe, Asia, the Caribbean, Africa and the Middle East. For more information about Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. and registration details, visit www.zphib1920.org.